The road to riches

Standard

Imagine that 100 people live in America. Ninety-nine of them are not millionaires. Just one is, and it’s not me.

 

Now, imagine that 535 members of Congress spend time in Washington failing to enact legislation to balance the budget. What percentage do you think are millionaires? Since one American in a hundred is a millionaire, you might guess that 5.3 of them have at least seven digits of net worth. (I know you’re troubled by the thought of  the .3 member: he’s been divorced twice and is paying alimony.)

 

Bipartisanship at its finest: everyone working together to create wealth for people that are themselves (See more information at: http://www.opensecrets.org/)

 

But really, you don’t have to worry about the divorced guy because if you go to opensecrets.org, you find that 40-50% of those who speak in sound bites are millionaires. Many, it’s true, are what we would call “poor” millionaires; they have assets worth less than $10 million. Not because they aren’t trying, but because so many congressional shoppers are out there looking for deals. Every day is Black Friday for Congress, and the mall is always crowded. Of course the assets listed on the website don’t necessarily reflect their spouse’s income, their congressional income, or the true value of their assets, so maybe some of them are just being modest.

 

I am upset.

 

I, too, can sit in chairs and fail to come to a consensus. I have had years of bitterness training, so I could add a lot to bitter partisanship. I get cold easily and would not mind cozying up to rich corporations with a few hot deals to share. I like to fly around in private jets and bring my family. I can talk for hours without saying anything of substance, and I love flip-flops. Why am I not in Congress getting rich off of the 99%!

 

If we want to get out of this economic slump and create wealth in this country, we need to enact mandatory Congress duty. It would be just like jury duty; all eligible Americans would serve one to two terms, enough time to double or triple their wealth. And I think that whoever she is in northeastern Wisconsin but originally from Texas that thought of this should serve first.

32 thoughts on “The road to riches

  1. You’ve got a great idea! Since I’m from Michigan, I thought that maybe the two mittens could become a pair, work together and you could represent us. How does that sound? 🙂

  2. WordsFallFromMyEyes

    No 1, I didn’t know 1 in every 100 Americans is a millionaire. I wonder what it is here in Australia. No. 2 I love your blog name! And 3, that was very interesting – and well put. It sickens me that some people have TOO MUCH money. I know, who am I to say what is too much? But when I read that Beyonce had already spent a million on her baby’s toys, I thought – I could buy a house for that, and leave it for my son in my will. It is enormously unbalanced, and tragically so. I’m your average – in debt, getting by, working – I’m not on the street or anything: but the billionaires etc; too much, too much. Surely money loses its taste when you have too much?

    • Millionaires represent approximately 1% of Americans, or a little over 3 million out of 311 million. Some estimate that the number is higher and some say it’s lower. If you go to the International Business Times website http://m.ibtimes.com/millionaire-wealth-management-156051.html they rank the US as the country having the most millionaires, but suggest there are around 5 million. Those numbers represent 2009/2010. On that same site, it gives a number of around 133,000 millionaires for Australia. Based on a population of 21.9 million, that means one out of every 166 Australian is a millionaire, too. (You might want to check my numbers. :))

      I have nothing against people working hard and earning money. Good for them. As long as we all pay our fair share of taxes and earn the money legally, I don’t care. I do have something against politicians wheeling, dealing, and making profits off of inside information, and then passing legislation that benefits corporations in which they hold stock. As for all the celebrities, sports figures, and other entertainers, if people are willing to pay that much money to watch them or listen to them, there’s nothing we can do about it. I think it’s ridiculous, so I don’t put my money there.

      Okay, now that I got that rant out. Hi, I really like the name of your blog, too. I will be over later today to read your posts.

      • WordsFallFromMyEyes

        Oh, no, I haven’t the mind or patience to check numbers – but I AM impressed with what you’ve written. I had no idea there were that many millionnaires in Australia – but you know, 1 million dollars isn’t actually THAT much I don’t reckon. I reckon it could buy me a house (to pass on to my son) and a holiday, & that’s it – oh, and a cat WHICH I COULD AFFORD THE NEEDLE/VET BILLS OF. But that’s it! I don’t actually think in this day & age, 1Mill is a lot (well it’s a lot to ME, but meaning a relative lot).

        I agree with you of the difference. I would have NO IDEA how to work taxation in my favour (if it were possible!) because I have not the mind, have not had the guidance, and I do not fancy numbers – I love words. But I DO ABSOLUTELY agree, re politicians and their leveraging.

        Great post.

        And thanks for your compliment to my name 🙂

        I really enjoyed your post.. N’n.

  3. I’ll vote for your Congressional system. The more people get stuck trying to actually *do* something in office in America for even a short period of time, the more they’re likely to rebel against all that so fiercely obstructs serious progress in our magical system!

  4. And I was having so much fun laughing until now…. (sigh) Still, it’s probably for the best, since if I’d done much more of that, I might have overdosed on it and died of laughter. 🙂

    I understand how it is though.. I write some posts about politics sometimes too.
    You just have to get the stuff off your chest sometimes.

    I look forward to reading more of your posts in the future.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s