Greetings from Accordia

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Accordia is an obscure country on the far, far border of the west that most people miss because they go one step too far and end up in the east. It’s an easy mistake, especially if you are prone to circular reasoning.

 

 

If by chance you find the border, you still might miss it because it’s such a small country. Accordia consists of one large alp. It’s national motto is “Accordia: A Hill of a Good Country.”

 

No one had heard of the country until recently (today, in fact), but it is the birthplace of the accordion. Accordians are touchy about this subject, and if you want to push an Accordian’s button, just casually mention that Christian Friedrich Ludwig Buschmann invented the accordion in 1822. After the bellowing stops, tell the person you were just kidding. Normally, Accordians aren’t that loud, but they are if you push them.

 

 

For unknown reasons, I was selected out of all of the millions of people in the Interlands to be the official representative of Accordia. I have been recording their vibrant history and plan to publish some of it sooner, later, or both.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accordia is an obscure country on the far, far border of the west that most people miss because they go one step too far and end up in the east. It’s an easy mistake, especially if you are prone to circular reasoning.

 

 

 

 

If by chance you find the border, you still might miss it because it’s such a small country. Accordia consists of one large alp. It’s national motto is “Accordia: A Hill of a Good Country.”

 

 

 

No one had heard of the country until recently (today, in fact), but it is the birthplace of the accordion. Accordians are touchy about this subject, and if you want to push an Accordian’s button, just casually mention that Christian Friedrich Ludwig Buschmann invented the accordion in 1822. After the bellowing stops, tell the person you were just kidding. Normally, Accordians aren’t that loud, but they are if you push them.

 

 

 

For unknown reasons, I was selected out of all of the millions of people in the Interlands to be the official representative of Accordia. I have been recording their vibrant history and plan to publish some of it sooner, later, both, or either.

 

 

 

 

Pronunciation is Everything #1

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Have you ever had an out-of-body experience? Me, neither. But I’ve had several out-of-WORLD experiences, in which my body has been lifted high above the WORLD (aka America) and been transported to places far, far away. Oddly, just as in out-of-body experiences, along the way I have been probed by aliens with blank stares, large hands, and wands (aka TSA).

Some of these experiences lasted a long time. Not the probing, the being in places far away. Places where people do not speak English, like Japan. At first, to make myself understood, I tried speaking English slowly. People did not understand me, so I put on my American thinking cap and started shouting in English. LIKE THIS! Finally, in desperation and because I really needed to find a toilet, I learned the language.

Now I can irritate people with puns and wordplay in two languages.

Once upon a time in that land far, far away, some people who publish a small bilingual magazine in Tokyo were filled with desperation over how to fill the back pages of their magazine. I appeared and offered them six cartoons, which they published. Nothing happened after that. And none of us lived happily ever after; they still had back pages to fill, and I continued on my lonely quest to find desperate publishers.

The cartoon below is a play on the English word man. If you use the Roman alphabet, you can write the Japanese word for Y10,000 as man.  The “a”  is pronounced like “ah.” (Ten thousand yen is currently about $128.)

This is my attempt to fill the back pages of my blog.